Hello, I'm Henry.  

Welcome aboard my blog's home. 

If you come along with me, you'll become acquainted with my motley mates and faithful crew:

Experiences, Sightings, Observations, Impressions, Ideas, Reflections, Remembrances, Insights and Commentary.

They, after all, have accompanied me for as long as I can recall. Their tenure has helped me turn my tiller, fill my sails, and transport me over seas to distant lands. Maybe if you take the time to get to know them, a few will do the same for you.

Click this way and scroll along if you please...Enjoy your stay.   

Lainie Reaches New Heights

Lainie Reaches New Heights

 “What did you say?”

“Get me the f..k down,” Voice atop a mast

“Get me down....NOW!”

“You’re almost there. We have to finish.”

“I’m done.

“Just s few more feet!”

“Did you hear me?”

Time:
Thursday, Feb 22, 2018 early morning

Location:
300 feet west of Long and Spirit Cays,
North Exumas, Bahamas

Weather:
sunny, cloudless, 80 degrees F

Wind Conditions:
easterly 10-12 knots

Sea Conditions:
waves less than a foot
gentle southerly surge from nearby southerly cut
some swaying motion; 

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Anchored near Spirit and Long Cays in the Exumas,  Mystique's main halyard suddenly came unhinged, disconnected and detached from the head of our mainsail. Somehow the shackle had unscrewed itself.  And when it happened I heard the pin drop and the 15-20 knot easterlies tossed and twisted its released pulley into a Gordian knot dangling 58 feet above deck. Hoping for the wind to calm, we waited four days to fix it.  We knew we were stuck if we couldn't use our mainsail.

A few Herculean tasks stared at us - climb our freaking mast, untangle the mess and lower it down so we could reattach it. Otherwise, our sailing further south into the Exuma Marine Land and Sea Park would end and we would have to continue our adventures towards obtaining some outside assistance.

 THe Gordian Knot Atop the Mast 

THe Gordian Knot Atop the Mast 

Challenge:
retrieve main halyard pulley hanging and knotted near top of 58' 6" mast.

Strategy:
- hoist one of us Baby Boomers
up the mast.
- untangle the Gordian Knot
- bring halyard down and re-attach to mainsail

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We looked around for other crew to volunteer, but when no one else stepped forward, we knew one of us would go aloft to fetch our halyard.  With barely a modicum of forethought, Lainie volunteered to untie the mess and retrieve our main’s halyard.  Climb our mast, without hesitation? Whoa, I thought, surely she mostly saw this as an extraordinary photo opportunity. Surely she wasn’t serious, until I realized she was. But then I insisted I go; but she refused to stay below to winch me up. Figuring I was stronger and more experienced with the winch. So up she went.

 The knot, winch, mast and halyard - all  became metaphors for our relationship. Winching someone close to 60 feet in the air on a windy morning is an act of trust. 

The knot, winch, mast and halyard - all  became metaphors for our relationship. Winching someone close to 60 feet in the air on a windy morning is an act of trust. 

The winch, mast, halyard and knot became amazing metaphors for our relationship. Winching anyone close to 60 feet in the air on a windy morning is an act of trust. 

 Gloved, secured and dressed for the occasion - no loose clothing.

Gloved, secured and dressed for the occasion - no loose clothing.

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 Lainie took this photo of her left foot on the spreaders and my hatted head at the spinnaker winch below.

Lainie took this photo of her left foot on the spreaders and my hatted head at the spinnaker winch below.

Carl & Carla's Long Perch

Carl & Carla's Long Perch

With Drawn Eyes

With Drawn Eyes