Hello, I'm Henry.  

Welcome aboard my blog's home. 

If you come along with me, you'll become acquainted with my motley mates and faithful crew:

Experiences, Sightings, Observations, Impressions, Ideas, Reflections, Remembrances, Insights and Commentary.

They, after all, have accompanied me for as long as I can recall. Their tenure has helped me turn my tiller, fill my sails, and transport me over seas to distant lands. Maybe if you take the time to get to know them, a few will do the same for you.

Click this way and scroll along if you please...Enjoy your stay.   

Finding Faroes

Finding Faroes

 Peaks, Fjords and Danes

Reindeer's 1976 Transatlantic Crossing

Friday, July 2, 1976

Voyage blog entry #22

The day was like glass. It was windless, and we had to run the mill [engine] all day. At 1500 land was sighted dead ahead; it was the island of Mykines, westernmost of the Faroes. Closing the islands, we passed near a Danish frigate, which we later learned was transporting a sick fisherman to the hospital in Torshavn, the capital. Mykines is a famous bird haven, and as we passed near to its northern shore, we could see puffins, razorbills, and guillemots literally blackening the skies.
— Newbold Smith in Down Denmark Strait ~ p.100
 Newbold Smith, Orlin Donaldson, Phil Parish (left to right); Frank Daiber wearing Swiss chapeau peer at our first view of the Faroes. Terry Lloyd not pictured and I am the photographer.

Newbold Smith, Orlin Donaldson, Phil Parish (left to right); Frank Daiber wearing Swiss chapeau peer at our first view of the Faroes. Terry Lloyd not pictured and I am the photographer.

 Click map to enlarge -  View video about the Faroes

Click map to enlarge - View video about the Faroes

After five pleasant sailing days from Iceland, Reindeer approached the Faroes at mid-afternoon on the sixth day. Mysterious, misty, mammoth mountains loomed up ahead. Cloud banks clung to the mysteriously jagged rows of cliffs before us. While the weather and winds had been favorable and cooperative during our 450-mile sail on the open sea, here the vervent, cragged heights seemed to alter the temperature and atmosphere. Something felt inviting and welcoming in the air.

These islands left no doubt they had endured a long history.  Wind, rain, and gravity had carved away at their features for centuries. Their peaks seemed formidable and foreboding formations with countless birds everywhere, lots of green growth, yet void of trees, shrubs, bushes, beaches or shorelines. All the mountainsides did not stop at the water's edge. Deep water everywhere.

As we closed in, winds started to swirl, while the water depth in the hundreds of feet remained constant (suggesting these mountains came straight up from the ocean floor), all six crew members stood vigilant for any signs of any adverse current flowing through this archipelago. At first sighting, the Faroes' seemed mystical, almost inexplicable and inhospitable for both human or animal. But first impressions are often misleading. We would discover a cordial culture and an intriguing civilization.

Leaving Mykines to starboard, we took a lucky course as we headed into Sorvaag Fjord, which has some “of the finest scenery along its outer coast. Especially interesting were the rocks that ancient winds and waves had carved into archways and pinnacles that look at Roman ruins.
— Newbold Smith in Down Denmark Strait ~ p.100
 Approaching boat traffic as Reindeer after entering Faroes.

Approaching boat traffic as Reindeer after entering Faroes.

 Faroese watch us arrive from a lighthouse and a passing skiff. Our first signs of humanity. Maybe their first signs of a foreign sailboat or sloop. As a fishing country, the Faroese seeing pleasure craft must have appeared odd to them.

Faroese watch us arrive from a lighthouse and a passing skiff. Our first signs of humanity. Maybe their first signs of a foreign sailboat or sloop. As a fishing country, the Faroese seeing pleasure craft must have appeared odd to them.

When we dropped anchor of the tiny village of Bo, we marked the end of Reindeer’s first and my third Atlantic crossing. 
— Down Denmark Strait ~ p 100
 Phil Parish and I stare at our austere surrounding after we anchored Reindeer near a small village called Bo.

Phil Parish and I stare at our austere surrounding after we anchored Reindeer near a small village called Bo.

 Choosing to anchor near a small village called Bo.

Choosing to anchor near a small village called Bo.

Our evening view on our first night in the Faroes. The next morning we noticed roads, telephone poles and small dwellings. Soon after we weighed anchor, we bigger boat traffic passed us.

Frank Daiber studies a valley's waterfall on the opposite shore.

Newbold at the helm in the Faroes.

Invisible Sightings

Invisible Sightings

 Heimaey, HelgaFell & Eldfell

 Heimaey, HelgaFell & Eldfell