Hello, I'm Henry.  

Welcome aboard my blog's home. 

If you come along with me, you'll become acquainted with my motley mates and faithful crew:

Experiences, Sightings, Observations, Impressions, Ideas, Reflections, Remembrances, Insights and Commentary.

They, after all, have accompanied me for as long as I can recall. Their tenure has helped me turn my tiller, fill my sails, and transport me over seas to distant lands. Maybe if you take the time to get to know them, a few will do the same for you.

Click this way and scroll along if you please...Enjoy your stay.   

Newport to Newfoundland

Newport to Newfoundland

First leg of Transatlantic Voyage

May 30 - June 6, 1976

Birds & Sea Sightings

Blog Entry #3

Our week-long close-hauled sail to Newfoundland was blessed by cooperative cold front: 20-25 knot northerly, gusty dry breezes.  From Breton Reef, Rhode Island, Reindeer made its way along the New England coast through the Cape Cod Canal, 150 miles offshore from Maine, then passed Nova Scotia and Sable Island to St. John, the most easterly point of North America. With the late May air hovering in the 50-60 degree range with clear skies, our crew felt energized and optimistic, especially when we learned the forecast was favorable the whole 5-6 day leg to Newfoundland.

Leaving Newport behind us.

  Sperm Whale sighting abeam  Reindeer  about 50 miles from the Maine coast.

Sperm Whale sighting abeam Reindeer about 50 miles from the Maine coast.

 Wearing unique headwear,  Toby Garfield at  the helm of  Reindeer on  its way to St. John's.  Notice our outboard motor tied to the stern rail. Looks like one of the first ever weedwackers!  Note strung to the railings are blue canvass wave protectors. These will prove very helpful during the four 70 + knot gales and their 5-6 story high seas that lay ahead on the Iceland leg.

Wearing unique headwear, Toby Garfield at the helm of Reindeer on its way to St. John's.

Notice our outboard motor tied to the stern rail. Looks like one of the first ever weedwackers!

Note strung to the railings are blue canvass wave protectors. These will prove very helpful during the four 70 + knot gales and their 5-6 story high seas that lay ahead on the Iceland leg.

  An exhausted and misguided winter wren 60 miles off shore rested and refueled on our spare fuel tanks.

An exhausted and misguided winter wren 60 miles off shore rested and refueled on our spare fuel tanks.

The gannets Newbold wrote about in Chapter 4 of Down Denmark Strait:

"The bird life took on an oceanic character. There were fulmars, great shearwaters, sooty shearwaters, once we saw a Manx shearwater. Wilson's petrels were common and black-capped petrels occasional. We also saw red and northern phalaropes, but only near shore. .....Bird life was outstanding. The gannets were our top choice - the way they soared and dived, their wingspan of six feet, and their distinctive white, black and yellow coloring. The gannet is without question my favorite sea bird. Pictures of the new supersonic jet, the Concorde, look like carbon copies of a gannet in flight. Occasionally, we heard the sonic boom of the Concorde [jets]; no wonder New York objected to those noisy newcomers."

A fulmar and a greater shearwater

As it would turn out, his was a pleasure cruise. Our next leg of our transatlantic voyage would prove much more difficult, challenging and exhilarating!

Orcas and Russian Sightings

Orcas and Russian Sightings

Newbold's Dock Walk

Newbold's Dock Walk